One Mission

 
When grappling with the question of how to model our business, we took a few cues from the Fungal Queendom

 

 

 

 

 

Many Stories

 

 

 

 

 

We facilitate a network of backyard mushroom growers and connect them with local markets.

 

 

Networks

The underground tentacle-like threads (known as mycelium) from which mushrooms arise, form a web of decentralized cells through which information and nutrients flow.

Networks are the most efficient means of organization by which to distribute resources and information (scientific research agrees, see slime mold study led by Japanese researcher Toshiyuki Nakagaki)

As a network, we partner with neighbors and restaurants in the Longfellow, Seward, Phillips, Powderhorn, and Corcoran neighborhoods of South Minneapolis to grow and distribute our mushrooms.

 

Local

Mushrooms obtain their nutrients from locally available sources, and distribute these nutrients through their local mycelial networks. The largest contiguous mycelial network in the world is located in Oregon and spans thousands of acres; however, the majority of mycelial networks span much smaller spaces. There is no global mycelial network, as it would take too much energy to sustain. 

We focus on a small handful of neighborhoods in Minneapolis. growing the movement toward hyper-local, resilient food economies. This tight network keeps us energy-efficient and nimble when adapting to change. 

 

 

Collaboration

Fungi are masters of collaboration. For instance, a sub-group of fungi known as mycorrhizal fungi (e.g. chanterelle, morel, etc) partner with trees giving their leafy friends water and nutrients in exchange for sugars. Additionally, many of the mycorrhizal fungi associate with bacterial colonies whose organic acids demineralize stones and are traded for fungal sugars. Ecologists agree that ecosystems thrive due to the benevolent arbitrative nature of fungi.

Backyard Fungi thrives due to its diverse and evolving partnerships  with homeowners, businesses and non-profits in the greater Twin Cities bioregion. Check out our Community page for more details. (coming soon)